Stop Saying That Kant Was a German Idealist

One of my greatest pet peeves is seeing anyone call Immanuel Kant a German Idealist. German Idealism, properly speaking, was a reaction to Kant, because they did not take “…Kant’s advice that we should not engage with concepts of which we can have no experience (instances of this are Fichte’s Absolute I, Schelling’s Absolute, and Hegel’s Geist)….” (“Fichte: Kantian or Spinozian? Three Interpretations of the Absolute I,” Alexandre Guilherme, South African Journal of Philosophy, 2010, vol. 29 number 1, p. 14).

Advertisements

One thought on “Stop Saying That Kant Was a German Idealist

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s